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Boston Magazine, May 2021 Antiracist Baby - Ibram X. Kendi, Ashley Lukashevsky Henry David Thoreau: Author, Philosopher, Naturalist - Donna Marie Przybojewski
The May 2021 issue of Boston Magazine features "The 100 Most Influential Bostonians," by David S. Bernstein. Ibram X. Kendi, The Thoreau Society's keynote speaker for 2021, is #2 on the list (second only to the "Vaccine makers"). Additional articles: "The New Teenage Moguls" / Catherine Elton ; "Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Go Back Outside ..." / Chris Sweeney; "The Thrill of the Hunt" / Lisa Pierpont; "The Once and Future Kenmore Square" / Rachel Slade; and "Boston's Hollywood Problem" / Dart Adams; plus entries in "The Hub," "Life & Style," and "Home & Property." As colorfully illustrated as you may imagine.
Boston Magazine, 2021. Paperback, 116 pp.
A children's board book borne out of Ibram X. Kendi's bestseller for adults, How to Be an Antiracist. Designed for the young to imagine a world without racism. Offers nine steps they can take to make equity a reality.
Kokila, Penguin Random House, 2020. Board book, 24 pp.
A discussion starter coloring book to help young minds learn about and relate to this American author. Written and illustrated by Donna Marie Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2016. Paperback, 8 x 11 inch format, 48 pp.
Quotations of Henry David Thoreau - Henry David Thoreau, Richard Smith Quotations of John Muir - John Muir, Richard Smith A Short Biography of John Muir - Richard Smith
A collection of 100 Thoreau quotations, taken from his letters, books, Journals, lectures and essays. Arranged chronologically with citations. Collected and edited by the Thoreau Society's own Richard Smith.
Applewood Books, 2017. Hardcover, 32 pp.
A collection of about 100 quotes from John Muir, complete with attributions of original sources. Collected and edited by The Thoreau Society's own Richard Smith.
Applewood Books, 2018. Hardcover, 32 pp.
A succinct look at the life of American author and naturalist John Muir (1838-1914). Penned by The Thoreau Society's own Richard Smith. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Benna Books / Applewood Books, 2018. Hardcover, 28 pp.
A Short Biography of Henry David Thoreau - Richard Smith Interpreting America: Russian and Soviet Studies of the History of American Thought - John Ryder, Nikita Pokrovsky The Daily Henry David Thoreau: A Year of Quotes From the Man Who Lived in Season - Henry David Thoreau, Laura Dassow Walls
A succinct look at the life of American author Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862). Penned by The Thoreau Society's own Richard Smith. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Benna Books, 2018. Hardcover, 28 pp.
Makes available for the first time to English-speaking readers Russian views of the full range of American philosophical thought: from seventeenth-century Puritanism through the colonial and revolutionary periods, nineteenth-century idealism, pragmatism, naturalism, and other 20th-century movements and figures. Reconstructs a chain of core ideas, emphasizes the most essential concepts of each writer's work, and gives a multidimensional reconstruction of the arguments of each author. With a foreword by Nikita Pokrovsky.
Vanderbilt University Press, 1999. Hardcover, 326 pp.
Embodies, in small compass, Henry David Thoreau's ambition to "live in season" -- to turn with the living sundial of the world and, by attuning ourselves to nature, heal our modern sense of discontinuity with our surroundings. Drawn from the full range of Thoreau's journals and published writings and arranged according to season, this collection allows us to discover the endless variation and surprise to be found in the repetitions of mundane cycles. Thoreau's world lives on in his writing so that we, too, may discover, even in a fallen world, a beauty worth defending.
The University of Chicago Press, 2020. Paperback, 186 pp.
Born in the Nick of Time: Discussion Coloring Book - Donna Marie Przybojewski Ringing Here & There: A Nature Calendar - Brian Bartlett The Rattling Window: Poems - Catherine Staples
A discussion starter coloring book to teach children about the life, family, and friends of American author Henry David Thoreau. Written & Illustrated by Donna Marie Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2017. Paperback, 84 pp..
Canadian poet Brian Bartlett offers a daily diary from one spring to another, this time in pose. He looks out at his surroundings with a poet's eye for detail, his ear attuned to the ringings of the natural world. Grounded in Nova Scotia, but reflecting travels further afield to Alberta, Nebraska, New York City, and Ireland, the entries take on the qualities of field reports, sketches, commentaries, tributes and laments, quotations and collages. Through 366 daily entries, he shows that the resonance between human life and nature is just waiting to be heard.
Fitzhenry & Whiteside, 2014. Papeback, 172 pp.
A collection of poems by Catherine Staples. Themes are: Coming & Going; Into the Gree; and Paint Like Breath on a Pane of Glass.
The Ashland Poetry Press, 2013. Paperback, 78 pp.
A Life of Joy: Childhood Memories of Henry David Thoreau - Donna Marie Przybojewski The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature - J. Drew Lanham The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man's Love Affair with Nature - J. Drew Lanham
As Henry David Thoreau goes through his daily activities at Walden Pond, he is reminded of a childhood memory. It is important for us to remember that he experienced a joyful childhood. In his journals, he recorded many memories that were told to him by his mother, Cynthia. Childhood for him was a magical time spent with his family, especially with his brother John, roaming the woods in Concord. He treasured these times. Written & Illustrated by Donna Marie Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2020. Paperback, 32 pp.
Edgefield County, South Carolina, has been home to generations of Lanhams, dating back to slavery. Given their family name by slaveholders, the Lanhams created a personal legacy of grit and affection even in the midst of hard times. Here we meet a number of these determined people, including the young Drew, who falls in love with the natural world around him. This is at once a moving memoir and an exploration of the contradictions of black identity in the rural South and in America today.
Milkweed Editions, 2016. Paperback, 216 pp.
Here Lanham explores his obsession with birds and all things wild in a mixture of poetry and prose. With a refreshing balance of reverence and candor, he paints a unique portrait of the natural world. The resulting meditations are as honest as they are illuminating.
Hub City Press, 2021. Hardcover, 94 pp.
Margaret Fuller: A New American Life - Megan Marshall The Peabody Sisters: Three Women Who Ignited American Romanticism - Megan Marshall A Naturalist and Other Beasts: Tales from a Life in the Field - George B. Schaller
The award-winning author of The Peabody Sisters takes a fresh look at the life of great American heroine Margaret Fuller: Thoreau's first editor, Emerson's close friend, first female war correspondent, passionate advocate of personal liberation. Marshall's Pulitzer-Prize winning biography gives a thorough and compassionate view of an extraordinary woman.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013. Paperback, 6 x 9 inch format, 474 pp.
Elizabeth, Mary, and Sophia Peabody were in many ways our American Brontes. The story of these remarkable sisters ? and their central role in shaping the thinking of their day ? has never before been fully told. Twenty years in the making, Megan Marshall's monumental biograpy brings the era of creative ferment known as American Romanticism to new life. Elizabeth, the oldest sister, was a mind-on-fire thinker. A powerful influence on the great writers of the era ? Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau among them ? she also published some of their earliest works. It was Elizabeth who prodded these newly minted Transcendentalists away from Emerson's individualism and toward a greater connection to others. Mary was a determined and passionate reformer who finally found her soul mate in the great educator Horace Mann. The frail Sophia was a painter who won the admiration of the preeminent society artists of the day. She married Nathaniel Hawthorne ? but not before Hawthorne threw the delicate dynamics among the sisters into disarray. Marshall focuses on the moment when the Peabody sisters made their indelible mark on history. Her unprecedented research into these lives uncovered thousands of letters never read before as well as other previously unmined original sources. The Peabody Sisters casts new light on a legendary American era. Its publication is destined to become an event in American biography. Highly recommended for students and reading groups interested in American history, American literature, and women's studies. It is a wonderful look into 19th-century life.
Houghton Mifflin, 2005. Paperback, 602 pp.
Eminent field biologist George Schaller has roamed through many lands observing wild animals and conducting landmark long-term studies that have deepened our understanding of these creatures. This collection of short pieces is the first and only overview of Schaller's remarkable career. The author's own photographs appear throughout: of animals and their behavior, and of himself and his family "at home" in wild places from Africa to Tibet. George B. Schaller won the Henry David Thoreau Prize for literary excellence in nature writing for 2020.
Sierra Club Books, 2007. Paperback, 272 pp.
The Guide to Walden Pond - Robert M. Thorson (Paperback) The Boatman: Henry David Thoreau's River Years - Robert M. Thorson (paperback) The Book That Changed America: How Darwin's Theory of Evolution Ignited a Nation - Randall Fuller
An exploration of the history, landscape, and literature of one of America's most iconic places. Abundantly illustrated with photographs, drawings, and maps, this guide is a must-have for a meaningful engaging tour of Walden Pond, as well as a souvenir of a visit. This book was reviewed in Thoreau Society Bulletin 304, Winter 2019, pp. 12-13.
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2018. Paperback, 272 pp.
(Also available in Hardback.)
Gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene epoch. As a backyard naturalist and river enthusiast, Thoreau was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. And he recognized that he himself--a land surveyor by trade--was as complicit in these transformations as the bankers, lawyers, builders, landowners, and elected officials who were his clients. Robert Thorson tells a compelling story of intellectual growth, as Thoreau moved from anger, to lament, to acceptance of the way humans had changed the river he cherished more than Walden Pond. In his twenties, Thoreau had contemplated industrial sabotage against a downstream factory dam. By the mid-1850s he realized that humans and an "imperfect" nature were inseparable. His beliefs and scientific understanding of the river would be challenged again when he was hired in 1859 as a technical consultant for the River Meadow Association, in America's first statewide case for dam removal--a veritable class-action suit of more than five hundred petitioners that pitted local farmers against industrialists. Thorson offers the most complete account to date of this "flowage controversy," including Thoreau's behind-the-scenes investigations and the political corruption that eventually carried the day. In the years after the publication of Walden (1854), the river boatman's joy in the natural world was undiminished by the prospect of environmental change. Increasingly, he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention--for better and worse. This book was reviewed in Thoreau Society Bulletin 299, Fall 2017, p. 14.
Harvard University Press, 2017. 2019. Paperback, 315 pp.
In 1860, Charles Darwin's just-published On the Origin of Species found itself among a group of American intellectuals, including Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, Charles Loring Brace, and the abolitionist Franklin Sanborn. Each of these figures seized on the book's assertion of a common ancestry for all creatures as a powerful argument against slavery. Yet they soon came to realize the threat Darwin's ideas posed to their faith and to their trust in American as a divinely chosen country. This bok is a biography of perhaps the single most important idea of that time and an account of a country torn apart by issues still with us today -- from racism to the enduring conflict between science and religion.
Penguin. 2017. Paperback, 294 pp.
Spiritual Audacity: Six Disciplines of Human Flourishing - Jim Sherblom Spiritual Pilgrim: A Memoir - Jim Sherblom If Henry David Thoreau Traveled the Southwest: An Imaginary Saunter - Donna Marie Przybojewski
2,600 years ago, an explosion of philosophers in different parts of the world began spiritual disciplines that would reverberate through history and time. Sherblom unearthed these disciplines in his journey from wealth and power to wisdom and purpose. With humor and grace, he elucidates the six principles: Resilience, Surrender, Gratitude, Generosity, Mystery, and Awakening. This book will guide you from black and white to color, from formless to form, from dark o light, and from curious to enlightened.
Wise Ink Creative Publishing, 2018. Paperback, 293 pp.
As a venture capitalist and early investor in biomedicine, Jim Sherblom sought to make a positive impact in the world. At the height of his career, he experienced what could only be called a spiritual awakening, and was drawn away from that success to follow his calling as a newly ordained UU minister. What followed was a multi-religious exploration across the globe, through time and space, and into the transcendental experiences of religious mystics. Here he reflects on his journeys of awakening and the teacings he uncovered from occupying the liminal space of the mystics. He shares these lessons so that others may live deeply and curiously and experience the awakened joy of twenty-first century transcendentalism.
Wise Ink Creative Publishing, 2018. Paperback, 290 pp.
As one who first suggested that land be preserved for instruction and recreation, Henry goes on an imaginary saunter to various national parks in the Southwest. A children's picture book written and illustrated by Donna Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2018. Hardcover, unpaginated.
Henry David Thoreau, Who Can He Be? Read and Find Out - Easy as A,B,C - Donna Marie Przybojewski Henry David Thoreau: Bell Ringer for Justice - Donna Marie Przybojewski Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America - Ibram X. Kendi
A children's A-B-C book that explores the life and writings of Henry David Thoreau. With full color illustrations on each page. Written and Illustrated by Donna Marie Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2016. Hardcover. 32 pp.
Henry David Thoreau was a man of principle and integrity and was an advocate of social justice. He fought against slavery and injustice. His words still challenge us to live according to conscience and to act upon the principles of justice. He encourages us not to be complacent, but to become the change we want to see in the world. This book for young readers was written and illustrated by Donna Marie Przybojewski. SIGNED BY THE AUTHOR.
Streamline Publishing, 2019. Paperback, 58 pp.
Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America - more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society. The life stories of five major American intellectuals offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation’s racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, this book offers us the tools we need to expose them -- and in the process, gives us reason to hope. Ibram X. Kendi is The Thoreau Society's Dana S. Brigham Keynote Speaker for 2021.
Bold Type Books, 2017. Paperback, 608 pp.


Henry David Thoreau: A Life - Laura Dassow Walls (Paperback) Confluence: Harpers Ferry as Destiny - Dennis E. Frye, Catherine Magi Oliver Walden's Shore: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Science - Robert M. Thorson
Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Laura Dassow Walls has written a new life of Henry David Thoreau, giving us a Thoreau in all his profound, inspiring complexity.“The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time. This book was reviewed in Thoreau Society Bulletin 298, Summer 2017, p. 12. Also available in hardcover.
University of Chicago Press, 2017, 2018. Paperback, 615 pp.
Offers a history of Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, that is both sweeping and intimate. Discover the national dramas that have converged at this place. Slavery and the quest for freedom. War, expansion, and revolution. Natural disaster upon natural disaster, and the enduring human spirit that has refused to relinquish hope. Published in honor of the 75th anniversary of Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. Highly illustrated. SIGNED BY THE AUTHORS.
Harpers Ferry Park Association, 2019. Paperback, 225 pp.
Thorson is interested in Thoreau the rock and mineral collector, interpreter of landscapes, and field scientist whose compass and measuring stick were as important to him as his plant press. At Walden's climax, Thoreau asks us to imagine a "living earth" upon which all animal and plant life is parasitic. This book examines Thoreau's understanding of the geodynamics of that living earth, and how his understanding informed the writing of Walden. The story unfolds against the ferment of natural science in the nineteenth century, as Natural Theology gave way to modern secular science. That era saw one of the great blunders in the history of American science--the rejection of glacial theory. Thorson demonstrates just how close Thoreau came to discovering a "theory of everything" that could have explained most of the landscape he saw from the doorway of his cabin at Walden. At pivotal moments in his career, Thoreau encountered the work of the geologist Charles Lyell and that of his protégé Charles Darwin. Thorson concludes that the inevitable path of Thoreau's thought was descendental, not transcendental, as he worked his way downward through the complexity of life to its inorganic origin, the living rock. This book was reviewed in Thoreau Society Bulletin 288, Winter 2015, p. 8.
H
arvard University Press, 2014. Paperback, 6 x 9 inch format, 421 pp.